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For ‘March’ Fairweather’s exhibition through MARCH 29th. Leah Kohlenberg, abstract artist.

 

“Blue Highway”  Leah Kohlenberg, abstract painter

“I often find that the best way to work with paintings is to work in a series: that is, to take a single idea and tease it out over several paintings, using specific mediums, style and content.”

 

 

 

Leah Kohlenberg has been painting for eighteen years and is mostly self-taught, although the artist has taken classes at the Gage Academy of Fine Art in Seattle and the Pacific Northwest College of the Arts in Portland and has studied privately with a host of professional painters spanning the globe in Budapest, Armenia, Croatia and New York City.

 

 

“I have taught art for 11 years, first by helping start an English language art school called Sziv Studios in Budapest, Hungary with American artist Paula Brett, and since then teaching hundreds of students of all ages.  I founded the Roaming Studio for teaching art classes in 2010 (renamed Leah Kohlenberg Fine Art Classes in 2016).”

 

 

I was awarded a Regional Arts and Culture Council Grant to publish my first book, The Roaming Studio Step-by-Step Guide to Drawing Faces, released in early 2016.  I also offer an Art at Work Program, designed to bring drawing and painting classes to non-professionals in the workplace.” 

© 2018 Leah Kohlenberg

 

To read more about the Fairweather artist, please visit https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.wpcomstaging.com/2018/09/25/for-exploring-new-surfaces-fairweathers-oct-exhibition-artist-leah-kohlenberg/

 

 

 

 

“March Grasses in the Light” by  Leah Kohlenberg, abstract painter

 

 

“I primarily work in acrylic. I use a lot of glazing mediums and build up the darks, rather than start with them.  It creates the feeling of light coming out of the darkness, an appropriate sentiment for these absurd and terrible times.  I am looking forward to the March show on Mar. 2.  I  have  five paintings (including two framed pastels). I have just printed a set of eight note cards, featuring pastel scenes of the Oregon Coast.”

 

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