I took advantage of some figure drawing sessions from life.
These drawing sessions were so engaging, I felt swept up in the moment. The time flew as I went from pencil, to fountain pen, to charcoal and sumi ink. Small sketches gave way to large drawings, then sketching with ink and brush using large gestural movements. Finally, I was ready for paint and canvas. The painting above is the first in a series of paintings featuring the portrait and figure in interior scenes. I think that several of these will fit well in the theme of “Balancing Act,” September’s show at Fairweather House and Gallery in Seaside, Oregon.”  Melissa Jander

  • I am painting in my new Camano Island studio and rejoicing in the light and atmosphere up here.

  • My goal is to continue creating romantic and hopeful paintings which entice the viewer to stop awhile and enjoy the simple and beautiful moments in life.” —MJ

Current Artist Inspiration: Berthe Morisot and Elizabeth Sparhawk-Jones
Currently Listening Ballet Music
 https://open.spotify.com/playlist/7wZnObobkQoVhNMVYgqLb9?si=SHETRXKpQVSnFcTIdt7G1w
Current Palette: leafy greens, sky blues, pale ochres, violet, deep blues and earthy umbers.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

September 3 through September 25

 

BALANCING ACT, an exhibition highlighting the symmetry found in contemporary and traditional art.

Features watercolorist Paul Brent,  ceramic artist Sandy Visse, mural artist Toni Avery, en Plein air and studio artist Melissa Jander, whimsical artist Marga Stanley, contemporary artist Diane Copenhaver, mixed media artist Jan Rimerman, fine jewelry maker Jim Hayes, and craft maker Pat Tulip. 

 

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

“The Balance”
Acrylic on wood cradle
24×18
MARGA
 

With each coat of paint, whether watercolors, gouache, acrylics, or oil comes depth and motion…it’s exciting and satisfying to see my work evolve from one layer to the next. I love using odd tools to paint with….for instance, Some images in my whimsy collection are painted with a toothpick (I couldn’t find a small enough pallet knife) MARGA

Frankenbunny’s Tea Party (ants included)
Oil on wood board
11×14
MARGA
 

Frank N. Bunny’s trying to escape the ants by balancing his tea cake on his head. His tea party is not going as planned. And the ants keep coming.”  Marga

My art training comes from watching and experimenting and then doing it repeatedly, exposing a little more of me, Marga, with every attempt. I love the movement of things… whether it’s the hair or feather on a bird’s head or the drooping of a flower’s leaf…I want to make my painting live and breathe. I read Bedtime Stories in Marga’s World for eight delightful years on KMUN radio. I wrote my own children’s story. This was stimulating and a great way to fuel my imagination for my art. MARGA

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

September 3 through September 25

 

 BALANCING ACT, an exhibition highlighting the symmetry found in contemporary and traditional art.

Features watercolorist Paul Brent,  ceramic artist Sandy Visse, mural artist Toni Avery, en Plein air artist Melissa Jander, whimsical artist Marga Stanley, contemporary artist Diane Copenhaver, mixed media artist Jan Rimerman, fine jewelry maker Jim Hayes, and craft maker Pat Tulip. 

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

Raw edge wood sculpture with inlaid marble and slate mosaic by mater artisan Stuart Dittbrenner. Also showing artist Gary Pearlman’s abstract strokes series and artist Martha Lee’s impasto art selected for Fairweather’s DIFFERENT STROKES August exhibition.

For DIFFERENT STROKES, Fairweather’s August exhibition, watercolor artist Lieta Gratteri featured art created from her summertime garden and presented new gift cards during the opening reception at Fairweather’s.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

DIFFERENT STROKES, an exhibition of original abstracts and contemporary works.

Through August 25

Features mixed media by Bill Baily, watercolors by Paul Brent, en Plein air work by Karen Doyle, Art Deco works by Rene Hafeman, acrylic art by Ashley Larsen, fused glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindbergimpasto art by Martha Lee, and encaustic works by Peg Wells.

DIFFERENT STROKES collage of featured art:  Birch Trees watercolor by Paul Brent, mixed media works by Bill Baily, en Plein air by Karen Doyle, and encaustic art by Peg Wells.

First shout out! Celebrating the arts since 2004, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk is a journey through the Historic Gilbert District. Free and open to the public,  parking is found on Holladay and Oceanway. The next event is on September 3 between 5- 7 p.m.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

September 3, 5-7 p.m.

Seaside

Opening reception for BALANCING ACT, an exhibition of contemporary and traditional art.

Features watercolorist Paul Brent,  ceramic artist Sandy Visse, mural artist Toni Avery, en Plein air artist Melissa Jander, whimsical artist Marga Stanley, contemporary artist Diane Copenhaver, mixed media artist Jan Rimerman, fine jewelry maker Jim Hayes, and craft maker Pat Tulip. 

Neal Maine, naturalist, lecture at 6 p.m. 

Fairweather House and Gallery has become one of the historic Gilbert District’s sought after destinations offering an ever-changing amazing visual experience.”  Seaside Signal 2009

Representing a collection of fine art and craft  by an exceptional group of regional artists for over fifteen years. From traditional to transitional, contemporary to realism, impressionism to emerging art.

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

 

Meticulous displays, like none other, with disciplined attention to design perspectives. Find harmony in exquisite materials, combined with the spirit of many artists who know how to apply the mark of being in the Northwest.

Find where interior design is not decorating but rather giving coastal homes the peaceful lifestyle. Find where everyday dreams are integrated with irreplaceable humanity, friendship and beauty.

Display #1 for DIFFERENT STROKES:  Watercolor floral by Mary Lyn Gough, fused glass bowl by Christine Downs, glass platter and glass leaves by Monet Rubin, glass plate by Bob Heath, botanical art by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, “Along the Winding Road” (Paul McCarthy quote) in calligraphy by Penelope Culbertson, one-of-a-kind jewelry by Mary Truhler, and vintage Louis XV key- lock it ™ necklace by Rene Hafeman.

 

Display #2 for DIFFERENT STROKES.  Teasel and bird watercolor by JoAnn Pari-Mueller, encaustic roses by Peg Wells,  poppy art by Jan Rimerman, watercolor florals by Leita Gratteri, mixed media collage by Sherrie Stahl, painted urchin rocks by Kandy Swartz, handmade glass dragonfly color spot by Bob Heath, wooden bee bowl by Janis Childs, wood carved turntable by Stuart Dittbrenner, and glass floral dish by Christine Downs.

Display #3 for DIFFERENT STROKES: Pelican oil painting by Paul Brent, raw edge table by Stuart Dittbrenner, impasto art by Martha Lee, sunset pottery by Marilyn Cohn, abstract fused glass by Christine Downs, woven baskets by Jan Dittbrenner, and carved wood chair by Will & Avery.

Display #4 for DIFFERENT STROKES.  Heron mosaic set in wood by Stuart Dittbrenner, sunset oil by Victoria Brooks, pastel four by four chairs and handpainted stemware by Gretha Lindwood, handpainted linens and wooden sunflower bowl by Janis Childs, print of metal by Mike Mason, fused fluted glass by D’arcy Martin, vintage glass from Paul Brent, series of oil paintings on board by Karen E. Lewis, impasto art by Martha Lee, vintage chevron gold abstract caddy, and handmade pottery by Marilyn Cohn.

Display #5 for DIFFERENT STROKES.  Contemporary art by Ashley Larsen, abstracts by Leah Kolenberg, encaustic art by Peg Wells,  fused glass by Monet Rubin, vintage woven glass bowl, stylish handpainted scarves by Cicely Gilman, pottery by Marilyn Cohn, fused glass slump bowl by Christine Downs, woven paper cards by Kris Zorko, and a fine collection summer reads hard-cover books.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

DIFFERENT STROKES, an exhibition of original abstracts and contemporary works.

Through August 25

Features watercolors by Bill Baily, en Plein air work by Karen Doyle, frescoes by Agnes Field, Art Deco works by Rene Hafeman, acrylic art by Ashley Larsen, fused glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, impasto art by Martha Lee, and encaustic works by Peg Wells.

 

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

“Fairweather House and Gallery has become one of the historic Gilbert District’s sought-after destinations offering an ever-changing unique visual experience.” —Seaside Signal.

Representing a collection of fine art and craft by an exceptional group of regional artists for over sixteen years, from traditional to transitional, contemporary to realism, and impressionism to emerging art.

DIFFERENT STROKES  staging by KD Fairweather, Allied member, A.S.I.D., American Society of Interior Designers.

Images by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall for Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Glass Nest 2022

A new piece out of the kiln! I’m continuing my fascination with nests. Something about them just intrigues me and makes me happy.”   Glass artist Carolyn Myers Lindberg

As a former ceramicist, I’ve worked in glass since 2012 and recently moved to Seaside from Portland.  I received early instruction at Bullseye Glass, and the rest of my work and style was developed through my own experience and exploration.  I want my creations to be used and held. Like many artists, I find inspiration in nature, whether the sea, the sky, or the forest, and I’m constantly surprised by beauty in unexpected places.  I love exploring and experimenting with color and texture that I find in the natural world close to home or faraway places worldwide.” CML

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St. 

DIFFERENT STROKES, an exhibition of original abstracts.

Through August 25

eaturing watercolors by Bill Baily, en Plein air work by Karen Doyle, frescoes by Agnes Field, Art Deco works by Rene Hafeman, acrylic art by Ashley Larson, fused glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, impasto art by Martha Lee, and encaustic works by Peg Wells.

 

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

“Sunset Sea” oil impasto on linen by Martha Lee

Secret gardens, places and frescos, these are things of
antiquity that have inspired my paintings.

Organic forms, patterns, textures, changing light effects and rich,
the luminous color of the sea is the subject of my work.

I am working on impasto paintings of spectacular sunsets that are filled with glowing gold.”  Martha Lee

Her passion for the natural world inspires Martha Lee’s paintings. She set up her first studio in Seattle in 1982 and has been creating in oil, pastel, and mixed-media ever since.

Her work consists of textured surfaces, and her goal is the let the mysteries emerge, infusing each piece with a sense of timelessness, universality, and infinity.

She continually attempts to capture the changing light effects of dawn, dusk, and twilight and the mysteries of nature.

Coast Chronicles: Appaloosa lopes into a Nahcotta woman’s …

https://www.chinookobserver.com › opinion › columns

Feb 24, 2020 — Artist and Nahcotta, Washington resident Martha Lee began her passion for horses at 8. She grew up in Chehalis, and no one else in her family …

Q: What is impasto painting, you ask?

A: Impasto is an art term used to describe thickly textured paint that is almost three-dimensional in appearance. Using an impasto technique often leaves visible brush strokes in the finished painting. Impasto is a type of sculpture, but it is on a canvas for painters. The paint is laid onto a surface thickly, holding the imprint of an artist’s brush or palette knife.

The impasto oil painting technique is usually associated with the work of Vincent Van Gogh. He applied the paints directly onto the canvas and simply mixed them with his fingers. One of the examples of the impasto technique in his oeuvre is the painting The Starry Night.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

DIFFERENT STROKES, an exhibition of original abstracts.

Through August 25

Featuring watercolors by Bill Baily, en Plein air work by Karen Doyle, frescoes by Agnes Field, Art Deco works by Rene Hafeman, acrylic art by Ashley Larsen, fused glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, impasto art by Martha Lee, and encaustic works by Peg Wells.

 

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

Soft celadon ceramics by Marcia Hudson, clay artist.

Iconic coastal patterns of gulls, sea stacks, clouds, and waves.

Signed. One-of-a-kind.

Vases, bowls, platters, and mugs.

Q: What is the difference between a ceramicist and a potter, you ask?

A: Both ceramicists and potters work with the same material: they go through the same process of wedging the clay, forming, firing, and glazing. So, it is a matter of preference how you want to call yourself if you work with clay. A ceramicist, a potter, a clay artist, a ceramic designer.

Q: What is a female potter called, you might ask?

A: A female pottery maker is called a potteress (plural potteresses)

Q: How did the name potter originate?

A: The name potter came from the Old French word of poterie.

Q: What is the favorite glaze in pottery?

A: Celadon is an all-time favorite glaze in pottery. It is a mint-gray-green color in ceramics, developed about the 2nd century C.E. Today, as it has done for thousands of years, celadon blends well in spaces with surrounding natural tones for a calming, earthy feel.

This color found in pottery and glaze typically appears gray-green in hue. The color of celadon owes much to the raw materials—specifically, the presence of iron in the clay and iron oxide, manganese oxide, and quartz particles in the glaze—as well as to the firing conditions inside the kiln.

Just in from Marica Husdon. Celadon ware. Functional and calming ceramics.  

Sharing a favorite quote from the artist.
Life is precious, life is fragile, and life is short.  Live each day with kindness and mindfulness. 

Marica Hudson is a member of the Artists in the Clay Guild of the Cascades (CGC). The Guild shares a passion for clay with each other and the community. They aim to promote creative self-expression in clay, share knowledge and experience, and facilitate an appreciation of handmade pottery and ceramics.

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

For THIS PLACE thru Jul 25

Seaside textile artist Cicely Gilman

Born in the USA, the artist lived with her family in Vienna, Austria, where she went to the American International School. I later graduated from St. Martin’s College of Art in London, England. She was a colorist for textile converters in New York City and then moved to Los Angeles, where she established “Cicely,” a silk painting company.

Cicely hand paints silks for boutiques, major museums, and selected gift shops, such as the High Museum, Whitney, and LACMA. She has had her work in various art shows around the country and as a featured artist at Fairweather Gallery. Recently she has been creating silk designs using a water theme, offering one-of-a-kind silk scarves, hand-sewn and hemmed, exclusively for the Seaside community.

 
 

Fairweather welcomes Candace Wilson.

I took ceramics in college, along with painting and drawing. I earned a B.S. in Applied Design After four years of college and trading paintings for dental work, I needed a job that used my skill set. I went back to college and studied graphic design. Fell in love with the four-color process, designing logos, and printing processes. 

My clay work reflects my graphic experience, using words, textures, and images. My drawings and fonts are made into rubber stamps and applied to wet clay. I enjoy making things using the slab technique or wheel-thrown pottery. I keep the “maker marks” on my pottery, so people know it is handmade. My quest is to make people smile and think positively when the world around us seems chaotic. -CW

Last call for THIS PLACE, July’s Fairweather special exhibition.

Art on display and for sale through July 25

Painters, artists, and photographers explore the language of landscape

THIS PLACE, a special exhibition with selected original works by regional artists Paul Brent, Victoria Brooks, Nick Brakel, Barbara Bacon Folawn, Cicely Gilman, Bev Drew Kindley, Neal Maine, JoAnn Pari-Mueller, and Jan Rimerman.

SHOUT OUT

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

 DIFFERENT STROKES, an exhibition of original abstracts.

Through August 25

Featuring watercolors by Bill Baily, en Plein air work by Karen Doyle, frescoes by Agnes Field, Art Deco works by Rene Hafeman, acrylic art by Ashley Larsen, fused glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, impasto art by Martha Lee, and encaustic works by Peg Wells.

AGNES FIELD for DIFFERENT STROKES

Aug. 2022 at Fairweather Gallery
The Astoria-based artist uses a matter-of-fact approach to painting and making objects by improvising and reusing found materials along with the paint to amplify the intended meaning.

She has a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University, has served as acting president of non-profit Astoria Visual Arts and Visual Arts Curator @KALA, and has participated in many juried exhibits and residencies.

“Painting is a dark romance – a sensuous love of paint and materials, but also the expression of unknown meaning that always finds its way to the surface. It is often on edge between making and destroying.

You can look at an object for a long time, and then one day, its meaning changes – which changes the object. Painting is one way of looking for the mystery that is always there hiding in plain sight and is the price of one’s time for understanding.” AF

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

In appreciation to THIS PLACE featured artist and Rain Spark director, Jan Rimerman, for the referral of Candace Wilson to the Gallery. And, too, in gratitude to DIFFERENT STROKES featured artist Agnes Field for the recommendation of the Gallery of fellow abstract artist Cicely Gilman. Those that live for the arts support the arts.

“Doug Fir Forest” 12×9 impasto oil by Karen Doyle

About the trees:

Botanist-explorer David Douglas — this tree’s namesake — described it as “one of the most striking and truly graceful objects in nature.” Tree expert Michael Dirr heralded it as “one of the noblest forest trees.” 

Douglas-fir,  scientific genus name Pseudotsuga menziesii,  the most common tree in Oregon, is the most crucial conifer in the state because of its ecological and economic significance. The Oregon legislature recognized this when it designated Douglas-fir the official state tree in 1936. 

Douglas-fir grows in various mixed conifer and hardwood forests in Oregon, from sea level to 5,000 feet elevation. The species has some ability to germinate and grow in the shade of other species and eventually replace them, but Douglas-firs prefer sunlight and mineral soil. Because of their immense size and thick bark, more giant trees can survive wildfire and reseed themselves in many burned-over areas.

The Oregon Champion Douglas-fir is 11.6 feet in diameter and 329 feet tall. Maximum heights can reach well over 300 feet, and diameters can reach 15 to 18 feet. Douglas-fir in the Pacific Northwest ranks as the second tallest tree species in the world behind the coastal redwoods in Southern Oregon and Northern California. When Douglas firs grow in dense forests, they self-prune their lower branches so the conical crown starts many stories above the ground. Commonly living to be at least 500 years of age, the oldest trees can be more than 1,500 years old. 

As a versatile timber tree, Douglas-fir has few rivals. No other tree in the world produces more wood products for human use. It’s strong, relatively dense wood produces large timber beams, boards, railroad ties, plywood, and wood fiber for paper manufacture. It is used for reforestation along the Pacific coast. Its seeds are produced first at the age of about 25 years and in large crops every 5 to 7 years.

“Roseate” rosy impressionistic 30×24 oil by Karen Doyle 

As its sound might suggest, roseate has to do with “rosy.” Anything that’s roseate is rose colored or pinkish. It’s often used in the term “roseate glow,” typically to describe a sunset.

About wild roses:

Roses first appeared on Earth around the time dinosaurs went extinct, 60 to 70 million years ago.
Fossil records indicate roses grew in Oregon during the Oligocene Epoch, 32 million years ago. 
There are three native rose species in the Inland Pacific Northwest: baldhip rose, Nootka rose, and Woods’ rose. Native Oregon roses are wild flowering shrubs providing total spectrum pollen for bees, bird nesting places, and small mammals seclusion. Their fruits or hips are tasty treats for wildlife and a powerhouse of essential human antioxidants. 

 The wild rose is the National Floral Emblem of the United States as the symbol of life, love, and devotion. 

“Fairweather House and Gallery has become one of the historic Gilbert District’s sought-after destinations offering an ever-changing unique visual experience.”Seaside Signal

Representing a collection of fine art by an exceptional group of regional artists for over sixteen years, from traditional to transitional, contemporary to realism, impressionism to emerging art.

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

“Butterfly” by JoAnn Pari-Mueller

Pacific N.W. artist working in watercolor, calligraphy, collage, and pastel media.

“Honeybees and Flowers” by JoAnn Pari-Mueller

Fine details catch my eye.  I am interested in the relationship between objects – the “collector mentality.”  I like the starkness of a subject against a white background, but may also intersperse geometric lines or shapes with the mostly curvilinear subjects. Often I use richly colored or detailed borders or backgrounds – influences of the many patterns and colors in my collections.”  JP-M

I won “Best of Show” in the 2022 Rose Festival Art Show at OSA (Oregon Society of Artists)? That was exciting. See my piece and read what the judge said. JP-M

Juror’s note: I thought that this was a most complete and sensational piece. The combination of the story, the beautiful calligraphy of the writing, and, at its heart, an exquisitely-realized rose makes this work a genuinely excellent selection. It drew me in at first glance, and the more time I spent with it, the more I appreciated it.

After 15 years as an art museum tour guide, I began immersing myself in art classes at area art schools and colleges. I am an active member of the Oregon Society of Artists, the Watercolor Society of Oregon, and the Portland Society for Calligraphy and have participated in numerous exhibits throughout the state.”  JP-M

New work by Jan Rimerman for THIS PLACE. 

“Unexpected Celebration” by Jan Rimerman

For THIS PLACE, Fairweather’s July exhibition, my botanical collection is bright and festive. 

This new series is saucy and ready to brighten up the world.”  Jan Rimerman, artist/ curator/ gallerist

Each piece begins with a powdered charcoal under painting with an ink drawing drawn over it.  Transparent fluid acrylics are painted on top in many layers to create luminescence and dimension.”  JR

When not in the studio or traveling, Jan  Rimerman is the Visual Arts Coordinator of the Lakewood Center, the Art Director of the L.O. Reads Program, and the Director of Rock…Paper…Turtle…Art for Wetlands in partnership with The Wetlands Conservancy and the Director of the Rain Spark Gallery. Playing competitive tennis keeps her on her toes. Jan is the turtle mother of six rescue turtles who follow her around the studio like puppies.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway

Seaside, Oregon

Art on display and for sale through July 25

Painters, artists, and photographers explore the language of landscape

THIS PLACE, a special exhibition with selected original works by regional artists Paul Brent, Victoria Brooks, Nick Brakel, Barbara Bacon Folawn, Cicely Gilman, Bev Drew Kindley, Neal Maine, JoAnn Pari-Mueller, Jan Rimerman, and more.

For THIS PLACE, the art created is my country garden where stories unfold daily betweem plants, flowers, pollinators, birds, and animals.”  JoAnn Pari-Mueller

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

July 2022 THIS PLace display at Fairweather’s featuring the art and calligraphy of JoAnn Pari-Mueller, pottery by Marilyn Cohn, landscape by Toni Avery, oil paintings by Paul Brent, paintings by Jan Rimerman, wood bowls by Janis Childs, ceramic boxes by Dan Peccia,  stemware by Rox and Bob Heath, beach carry-all by Betty Huffman, and impressionistic oils by Victoria Brooks.