Melissa Jander, Fairweather’s featured September artist, painted a Plein air oil sketch on the Seaside beach during her stay for the BALANCING ACT show.

Last Call.

Special Exhibition through September 25

BALANCING ACT

Features watercolorist Paul Brent,  ceramic artist Sandy Visse, mural artist Toni Avery, en Plein air and studio artist Melissa Jander, whimsical artist Marga Stanley, contemporary artist Diane Copenhaver, mixed media artist Jan Rimerman, fine jewelry maker Jim Hayes, and craft maker Pat Tulip. 

Opening reception images for BALANCING ACT, Fairweather’s exhibition. Collage by Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk photographer. Art by Michael Muldoon on the left and the upper right is artist Toni Avery pictured with her art, and on the lower right are patrons during the September Seaside First Saturday Art Walk.

Connecting art seekers and makers through thoughtfully curated exhibitions, juried shows, collaborative projects, and installations. Our commitment to local artists and frequent rotation of new exhibits offers visitors a fresh and dynamic art experience.”

October 01, 2022

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

October Art Walk 5-7 p.m.

Opening reception for TURNING, an exhibition featuring N.W. master wood-turners Mike Brown, Martin Conley, Stuart Dittbrenner, Daniel Harris, Robert McWhirter, and Tom Willing. Introducing live edge furniture by Richard Guadagni. Seaside Painting LIVE (™) episode by Paul Brent. Live music by Chelsea LaFey and Richard Thomasian.


Shout out for the new season

Through October 25

The TURNING exhibition will show new autumn-themed art by oil painter Colette Fallon, impasto painter Karen E. Lewis, photographer Linda Fenton-Mendenhall, and Aimee art by Vanessa K. Stokes.

Please read more about our Seaside Gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

Raw edge wood sculpture with inlaid marble and slate mosaic by mater artisan Stuart Dittbrenner. Also showing artist Gary Pearlman’s abstract strokes series and artist Martha Lee’s impasto art selected for Fairweather’s DIFFERENT STROKES August exhibition.

For DIFFERENT STROKES, Fairweather’s August exhibition, watercolor artist Lieta Gratteri featured art created from her summertime garden and presented new gift cards during the opening reception at Fairweather’s.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

DIFFERENT STROKES, an exhibition of original abstracts and contemporary works.

Through August 25

Features mixed media by Bill Baily, watercolors by Paul Brent, en Plein air work by Karen Doyle, Art Deco works by Rene Hafeman, acrylic art by Ashley Larsen, fused glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindbergimpasto art by Martha Lee, and encaustic works by Peg Wells.

DIFFERENT STROKES collage of featured art:  Birch Trees watercolor by Paul Brent, mixed media works by Bill Baily, en Plein air by Karen Doyle, and encaustic art by Peg Wells.

First shout out! Celebrating the arts since 2004, Seaside First Saturday Art Walk is a journey through the Historic Gilbert District. Free and open to the public,  parking is found on Holladay and Oceanway. The next event is on September 3 between 5- 7 p.m.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

September 3, 5-7 p.m.

Seaside

Opening reception for BALANCING ACT, an exhibition of contemporary and traditional art.

Features watercolorist Paul Brent,  ceramic artist Sandy Visse, mural artist Toni Avery, en Plein air artist Melissa Jander, whimsical artist Marga Stanley, contemporary artist Diane Copenhaver, mixed media artist Jan Rimerman, fine jewelry maker Jim Hayes, and craft maker Pat Tulip. 

Neal Maine, naturalist, lecture at 6 p.m. 

Fairweather House and Gallery has become one of the historic Gilbert District’s sought after destinations offering an ever-changing amazing visual experience.”  Seaside Signal 2009

Representing a collection of fine art and craft  by an exceptional group of regional artists for over fifteen years. From traditional to transitional, contemporary to realism, impressionism to emerging art.

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

 

Meticulous displays, like none other, with disciplined attention to design perspectives. Find harmony in exquisite materials, combined with the spirit of many artists who know how to apply the mark of being in the Northwest.

Find where interior design is not decorating but rather giving coastal homes the peaceful lifestyle. Find where everyday dreams are integrated with irreplaceable humanity, friendship and beauty.

Glass Nest 2022

A new piece out of the kiln! I’m continuing my fascination with nests. Something about them just intrigues me and makes me happy.”   Glass artist Carolyn Myers Lindberg

As a former ceramicist, I’ve worked in glass since 2012 and recently moved to Seaside from Portland.  I received early instruction at Bullseye Glass, and the rest of my work and style was developed through my own experience and exploration.  I want my creations to be used and held. Like many artists, I find inspiration in nature, whether the sea, the sky, or the forest, and I’m constantly surprised by beauty in unexpected places.  I love exploring and experimenting with color and texture that I find in the natural world close to home or faraway places worldwide.” CML

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St. 

DIFFERENT STROKES, an exhibition of original abstracts.

Through August 25

eaturing watercolors by Bill Baily, en Plein air work by Karen Doyle, frescoes by Agnes Field, Art Deco works by Rene Hafeman, acrylic art by Ashley Larson, fused glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, impasto art by Martha Lee, and encaustic works by Peg Wells.

 

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

“Sunset Sea” oil impasto on linen by Martha Lee

Secret gardens, places and frescos, these are things of
antiquity that have inspired my paintings.

Organic forms, patterns, textures, changing light effects and rich,
the luminous color of the sea is the subject of my work.

I am working on impasto paintings of spectacular sunsets that are filled with glowing gold.”  Martha Lee

Her passion for the natural world inspires Martha Lee’s paintings. She set up her first studio in Seattle in 1982 and has been creating in oil, pastel, and mixed-media ever since.

Her work consists of textured surfaces, and her goal is the let the mysteries emerge, infusing each piece with a sense of timelessness, universality, and infinity.

She continually attempts to capture the changing light effects of dawn, dusk, and twilight and the mysteries of nature.

Coast Chronicles: Appaloosa lopes into a Nahcotta woman’s …

https://www.chinookobserver.com › opinion › columns

Feb 24, 2020 — Artist and Nahcotta, Washington resident Martha Lee began her passion for horses at 8. She grew up in Chehalis, and no one else in her family …

Q: What is impasto painting, you ask?

A: Impasto is an art term used to describe thickly textured paint that is almost three-dimensional in appearance. Using an impasto technique often leaves visible brush strokes in the finished painting. Impasto is a type of sculpture, but it is on a canvas for painters. The paint is laid onto a surface thickly, holding the imprint of an artist’s brush or palette knife.

The impasto oil painting technique is usually associated with the work of Vincent Van Gogh. He applied the paints directly onto the canvas and simply mixed them with his fingers. One of the examples of the impasto technique in his oeuvre is the painting The Starry Night.

 

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

DIFFERENT STROKES, an exhibition of original abstracts.

Through August 25

Featuring watercolors by Bill Baily, en Plein air work by Karen Doyle, frescoes by Agnes Field, Art Deco works by Rene Hafeman, acrylic art by Ashley Larsen, fused glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, impasto art by Martha Lee, and encaustic works by Peg Wells.

 

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

For THIS PLACE thru Jul 25

Seaside textile artist Cicely Gilman

Born in the USA, the artist lived with her family in Vienna, Austria, where she went to the American International School. I later graduated from St. Martin’s College of Art in London, England. She was a colorist for textile converters in New York City and then moved to Los Angeles, where she established “Cicely,” a silk painting company.

Cicely hand paints silks for boutiques, major museums, and selected gift shops, such as the High Museum, Whitney, and LACMA. She has had her work in various art shows around the country and as a featured artist at Fairweather Gallery. Recently she has been creating silk designs using a water theme, offering one-of-a-kind silk scarves, hand-sewn and hemmed, exclusively for the Seaside community.

 
 

Fairweather welcomes Candace Wilson.

I took ceramics in college, along with painting and drawing. I earned a B.S. in Applied Design After four years of college and trading paintings for dental work, I needed a job that used my skill set. I went back to college and studied graphic design. Fell in love with the four-color process, designing logos, and printing processes. 

My clay work reflects my graphic experience, using words, textures, and images. My drawings and fonts are made into rubber stamps and applied to wet clay. I enjoy making things using the slab technique or wheel-thrown pottery. I keep the “maker marks” on my pottery, so people know it is handmade. My quest is to make people smile and think positively when the world around us seems chaotic. -CW

Last call for THIS PLACE, July’s Fairweather special exhibition.

Art on display and for sale through July 25

Painters, artists, and photographers explore the language of landscape

THIS PLACE, a special exhibition with selected original works by regional artists Paul Brent, Victoria Brooks, Nick Brakel, Barbara Bacon Folawn, Cicely Gilman, Bev Drew Kindley, Neal Maine, JoAnn Pari-Mueller, and Jan Rimerman.

SHOUT OUT

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

 DIFFERENT STROKES, an exhibition of original abstracts.

Through August 25

Featuring watercolors by Bill Baily, en Plein air work by Karen Doyle, frescoes by Agnes Field, Art Deco works by Rene Hafeman, acrylic art by Ashley Larsen, fused glass art by Carolyn Myers Lindberg, impasto art by Martha Lee, and encaustic works by Peg Wells.

AGNES FIELD for DIFFERENT STROKES

Aug. 2022 at Fairweather Gallery
The Astoria-based artist uses a matter-of-fact approach to painting and making objects by improvising and reusing found materials along with the paint to amplify the intended meaning.

She has a Master’s Degree in Studio Fine Art from New York University, has served as acting president of non-profit Astoria Visual Arts and Visual Arts Curator @KALA, and has participated in many juried exhibits and residencies.

“Painting is a dark romance – a sensuous love of paint and materials, but also the expression of unknown meaning that always finds its way to the surface. It is often on edge between making and destroying.

You can look at an object for a long time, and then one day, its meaning changes – which changes the object. Painting is one way of looking for the mystery that is always there hiding in plain sight and is the price of one’s time for understanding.” AF

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

In appreciation to THIS PLACE featured artist and Rain Spark director, Jan Rimerman, for the referral of Candace Wilson to the Gallery. And, too, in gratitude to DIFFERENT STROKES featured artist Agnes Field for the recommendation of the Gallery of fellow abstract artist Cicely Gilman. Those that live for the arts support the arts.

By request, SEA SYMPHONY article and inspirations from artist Jan Rimerman.

Sea Symphonies are more than being under the sea; it is all of the activity and excitement which goes on above the surf in a collection of rings, ropes, and boats.

The fishers of the ocean inspire paintings. A seaport offers mystery, a gritty natural beauty, and reveals a gentle ruggedness that takes you back to a time when the seas were as fierce as the people living upon them.  

Paintings depict sea remnants, resonating in pulses of lives long past. They are full of texture and secrets, which allow you almost to feel the salty wind and smell the briny sea.

Histories of lives echo over the misty water when walking on a pier during an early morning fog. A dawn walk along the seaboard offers crisp, spicy air over a low-tide land with barnacle-encrusted rocks exposed.

Frequently with no soul in sight, it feels like the world has rolled back into the centuries. Strolling on a deserted wharf, with disrupted sea birds overhead, one can discover shells underneath the planks, image histories in the bits of broken pottery, and wonder about the battered parts of boats. You absorb the energy of the generations and the ever-changing sea moods while pondering the trappings of generations of hard-working people whose blood responds to the sea calling.  –Jan Rimerman

Last call. Sea Symphony through June 25 An exhibition at Fairweather’s that features the newest original work from regional artists Sandy Viisse, Dorota Haber-Lehigh, Emily Miller, Gretha Lindwood, Jo Ann Pari- Mueller, Martha Lee, and Jan Rimmerman.

On July 2, the opening reception for THIS PLACE, an exhibition, with works by regional artists Paul Brent, Victoria Brooks, Nick Brakel, Agnes Field, Barbara Bacon Folawn, Cicely Gilman, Bev Drew Kindley, JoAnn Pari-Mueller, and Jan Rimerman. Artist talks at 5:30 p.m., followed by a lecture from biologist, naturalist, and photographer Neal Maine. Live music by Chelsea LaFey and Richard Thomasian. Seaside Painting LIVE ™ episode by Paul Brent.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Please read more about our Seaside gallery, our commitment to N.W. artists, and our products made by N.W. artists.

Neal Maine lectures at the Fairweather Gallery.

And, too,  the Seaside ospreys have returned to their nest located above Broadway Park for 2022. Neal Maine predicted the return date by researching their data from his decades-long log book.

The ospreys have returned. We repeat, the ospreys have returned.
Tune in to watch as they lay their eggs in the next month. –Necancum Watershed Council
 

Data from tracking studies revealed that adult males head north from wintering in South America before females, that Ospreys adhere to certain migration flyways, and that breeding pairs don’t migrate or overwinter together. In the spring in North America male and female ospreys work together to raise chicks and cannot do it on their own.  Osprey is a single species in its own genus. The osprey species is at least 11 million years old…

Read more: 

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Osprey/lifehistory

 
https://www.audubon.org › field-guide › bird › osprey
 
 

After a thirty-year career as an award-winning biology teacher at Seaside High School, Neal Maine became the first executive director of NCLC, which he co-founded in 1986. Since his retirement from the land trust in 2010, he has pursued his passion for nature photography through PacificLight Images, a partnership with Michael Wing, his grandson, dedicated to raising awareness of coastal ecology and the wildlife with whom we share the region’s estuaries, freshwater wetlands, and forests. 

Biologist, naturalist, and photographer Neal Maine:

THE COASTAL EDGE

In cycles older than time, forces deep within the earth push apart tectonic plates, creating and expanding the oceans whose waters are pushed and pulled by the sun and moon, cooled and heated and calmed and stirred to fury by the skies. Ocean collides with the continent, shattering the shore into a thousand facets: bare rock monoliths, vast expanses of sand, saltwater pools that drown, then drain, then soak, then drain. And in that shattering, life asserts itself, creeping and burrowing and swimming and perching in particular niches, flora, and fauna whose collective presence defines THE COASTAL EDGE.

NATURE’S TRAILS

A limpet creeps up a wave-washed rock, following the rise of the tide. A salmon follows ancient watershed trails to its natal stream. An otter travels along its living trap line for crabs to crayfish upside creeks in the estuary. A vole tunnels into the soft sponge on the forest floor. In the treetops, in the forest, across the land, in the water, and in the air, all become a living slate for NATURE’S TRAILS. This tracery of interwoven trails is unsigned but indelible to generations of travelers.

THE NEXT FRONTIER, OUR OWN BACKYARD

Humans: We take pictures, walks, deep breaths, memories, rides on waves, water, and timber in habitats that belonged to other trail makers. We thought we could never catch all the salmon, never cut all the big trees, and never pollute the ocean. In our hubris, we thought we could make our own trails. With renewed humility, we are learning how to share this place, to live together with our partner trail makers. PacificLight Images/ Neal Maine celebrates this partnership as we use our images to inspire others to honor nature’s trails in OUR OWN BACKYARD.

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to artists, and our products made by artists.
Proceeds from PacificLight Images by Neal Maine to support:
https://nclctrust.org

Jan Rimerman, 2022 Botanical Series
Artist/Art Administrator

Visual Art Coordinator Lakewood Center for the Arts

Curator Dee Denton Gallery

Director/Curator Rain Spark Gallery

Director Rock…Paper…Turtle…Art for Wetlands

The botanical works by Jan Rimerman displayed at Fairweather House & Gallery in April for the Life Forms Exhibit are compositionally framed within a graduated Art Nouveau border. The paintings are created with liquid watercolor on heavy watercolor paper and are mounted on birch cradles. The watercolors are sealed with Dorland wax to protect the surface. The series was inspired by Schreiner’s Iris  Gardens in Oregon.

These paintings depart from Jan’s typical charcoal pours with many layers, each revealing something new in the changing light of the day and seasons. Instead of working on the mystical revelation of texture, Rimerman is creating a three-dimensional effect through the composition and use of color and pattern. Returning to some of her early botanical forms seemed fitting for this spring. 

Many years ago, Jan had the opportunity to take a workshop from the Queen’s celebrated watercolorist  Peter Welton in England. She was the only non-professional watercolorist in the class and the only foreigner to boot. It was an extremely taxing experience, but one that taught technique and life lessons. The artworks in the Fairweather House and Gallery  “Life Forms” April 2022 exhibit are delicately patterned with stripes, dots, and unexpected detail as you inspect them.

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

LIFE FORMS

Art sale and exhibition

Through April 25

Featuring Seaside botanical artist Dorota Haber Lehigh

Oregon coast and Kaui artist and maker Emily Miller

Pacific University Emeritus Professor Jan Shield

 Cannon Beach pen and ink artist Britney Drumheller

Mixed media artist, gallerist, and curator Jan Rimerman

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to artists, and our products made by artists.

 

And, too, for the current times, revisiting Jan Rimerman’s SUNFLOWER Collection with new timely insights written by the artist.

Sunflowers At Dawn

The sunflowers are painted in Rimerman’s typical technique of starting with charcoal pour under-paintings. Adding up to 22 layers of transparent fluid acrylic paint on top of this substrate offers a three-dimensional luminosity.   The most difficult part of the process is waiting for each layer to dry between each application of color and texture. Organic forms are used as stencils to create the initial black and white underpainting; Water and powdered charcoal, the consistency of cinnamon, are applied to the white surface of heavy watercolor paper. When this layer dries the powdered charcoal is sealed onto the paper with a clear gel.  

In the sunflowers paintings, you may discover cedar boughs, sword fern fronds, and/or three turtle petroglyphs hidden beneath the botanical shapes. These are not revealed all at once, but present themselves as the light changes during the day and with the seasons.  By changing your observation angle you may see shapes and currents that were not viewed previously.  The paintings have something new to unfold each time you look at them.” —Jan Rimerman, mixed media artist

Sunflowers At Dusk

Sunflowers are the national flower of Ukraine.  Ukraine produces more sunflower oil than any other country.  The flowers are a powerful symbol of resistance of the Ukrainian people against the invasion by Russia.  The war has disrupted the growing season of this valuable plant which in turn disrupts the global food chain.  Soy and palm oils may fill part of the gap, but this brings another question of sustainable production with farmable land being converted from tropical forests.

Sunflowers are a powerful symbol of hope.  The buds trace the movement of the sun from east to west and the flowers face the rising sun of each new day. We can but hope that they will bloom again soon!” -Jan Rimerman

NEW! Barnable Basket reclaimed “ghost net” fishing gear sculptural basket by Emily Miller

Wild and wonderful ocean life forms are my inspiration for creating art and positive transformation, from the 5-point symmetry of a sea urchin, to the nesting patterns of endangered sea turtles, and to reclaiming “ghost net” fishing gear for functional and sculptural baskets. -EJM

 Life-sized sculptures of sea turtles, made by hand and signed by Emily Miller.


Emily Miller – Conservation & Science

What began as research into historical data on rare hawksbill sea turtles helps illuminate… read more 

New! For LIFE FORMS, tiny babyurchin bowl white gloss glaze and porcelain that holds 2 oz. from Emily Miller.

Wild and wonderful ocean life forms are my inspiration for creating art, such as the 5-point symmetry of a sea urchin.”  -EJM

 

And, too, traditional sized sea urchin bowls, signed by the artist Emily Miller have been re-stocked in the Fairweather Gallery for the LIFE FORMS exhibition that opens April 2nd!

Ocean-inspired sea urchin bowls from Emily Miller are now available in tiny (2 fl. oz.), small (4 oz), medium (32 oz.), and large (48oz.) sizes.

For LIFE FORMS. New 2022 Yellow and Blue “ghost net” marine debris woven basket by Emily Jung Miller.

Read more:

Ghost Net Landscape: fishing rope marine debris art …

 
Ghost Net Landscape, fishing rope fiber art, a marine debris art installation by Emily Miller, the Oregon artist… 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

 LIFE FORMS

Art sale and exhibition 

Through April 25

Featuring Seaside botanical artist Dorota Haber Lehigh

Oregon coast and Kaui artist and maker Emily Miller

Pacific University Emeritus Professor Jan Shield

 Cannon Beach pen and ink artist Britney Drumheller

Mixed media artist, gallerist, and curator Jan Rimerman

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to artists, and our products made by NW artists.

 

Take a note. Emily Miller will offer a demonstration of the unique versatility and functional use of her newest ghost net basket on April 2 at Fairweather’s.

 
I have created new illustrations for the Fairweather April exhibition that depict spring native flowers and native butterflies, moths, hummingbird and other species. 
I wanted to show a relationship between various plants and insects, celebrating our Pacific Northwest ecology. 
Many insects depend on native plants for both feeding and as host plants, layering their eggs on the particular plants. 
I wanted to show the plants not in isolation but as part of a larger community. 

 –-Dorota Haber-Lehigh

 
 

Lupine and Gray Streaked butterfly by Dorota Haber-Lehigh, botanical artist

Mixed media, 10” by 10” on woodblock 

Flowering currant and Polyphemus moth by Dorota Haber-Lehigh

Mixed media, 10” by 10” on woodblock 
 

Skunk cabbage, Pacific tree frog, and Eight spotted skimmer by Dorota Haber-Lehigh.

Mixed media, 10” by 10” on woodblock 

Skunk cabbage are beginning to emerge on the Oregon Coast. One of my favorites as it brightens the dark swampy winter. An illustration of skunk cabbage was completed as part of my Diploma in Botanical Illustration with Society of Botanical Artists in London.”  —DH-L

Dorota Haber-Lehigh exhibits and teaches drawing regionally, including online teaching.

Dorota Haber-Lehigh works from sketches in the field and finishes botanical illustrations in her studio, working with artist-quality colored pencils, watercolors, and walnut ink.

DOROTA HABER-LEHIGH
Dorota holds a Diploma in Botanical Illustration from the Society of Botanical Artists in the UK, degrees in Art and International Studies, and a master’s degree in teaching.

Born in Poland, her love for nature began when as a child, she accompanied her grandparents on mushroom hunting forays, spent hours in her parent’s gardens, and hiked summers in the Tatra mountains to forage for wild herbs and fruit.

She was an artist in residency at Bloedel Reserve on Bainbridge Island. Her commissions have included an installation of native plants of the Pacific Northwest at the Columbia Memorial Hospital in Seaside, Oregon.

 

Fairweather House and Gallery

612 Broadway St.

Through April 25

LIFE FORMS, an exhibition featuring Seaside botanical artist Dorota Haber Lehigh, coastal maker Emily Miller, Pacific University Emeritus Professor Jan Shield, pen and ink artist Britney Drumheller, and mixed media artist and curator Jan Rimerman.

 

https://fairweatherhouseandgallery.com

Please read more about our gallery, our commitment to artists, and our products made by NW artists.